English

During key stage 3, you will complete five units of work per year. You will have four lessons of English per week. Each half-term, you will develop skills in reading, writing, and speaking and listening.

Key Stage 3

Year 7
Unit 1: Baseline Test and Creative Writing
During this unit, you will explore a range of strategies to develop skills in descriptive and narrative writing under the theme of ‘The Darker Side of Disney’.
You will:

  • Learn a range of sentence structures and their effects
  • Review skills in paragraphing
  • Learn how to organise texts effectively to engage a reader
  • Develop vocabulary that sustains varied effects
  • Create roles that are interesting to the reader
  • Improve spellings by exploring spelling patterns and rules

How will I be assessed?
A creative piece of writing that subverts the fairy tale genre.
Unit 2: The Class Novel
During this unit, you will read and study a novel of the fantasy genre. Novels include, Skellig, Coraline and Wings.
You will:

  • Develop inference and ‘reading between the lines’ skills
  • Explore a writer’s intentions
  • Learn how to respond to a text using Point, Evidence, Explain (PEE)
  • Comment on a writer’s use of language
  • Select quotations from a text to prove a point
  • Learn how to use formal language to respond to a text

How will I be assessed?
An essay in response to the writer’s exploration of theme, character or setting.
Unit 3: Non-fiction Texts explored through Popular Novels
During this unit, you will read the novel ‘Wonder’ and focus on responding to a range of non-fiction texts, with opportunities to develop and create your own.
You will:

  • Explore a writer’s purpose in writing non-fiction
  • Match a writer’s style to the a target audience
  • Learn to comment on the techniques writers inform, explain and describe
  • Review paragraphing and structural techniques to organise non-fiction texts
  • Evaluate speaking and listening skills in order to use formal language and persuasive techniques
  • Create imaginative and thoughtful non-fiction pieces that engage a reader

How will I be assessed?
A portfolio of text types including a letter, a news article and a leaflet. A speaking and listening assessment will also be integrated into the unit.
Unit 4: Drama Text
During this unit, you will study a play script adaptation of ‘Frankenstein’ by Phillip Pullman.
You will:

  • Be introduced to the ‘Gothic’ genre and the context of Victorian society
  • Explore the characters within the text and the relationship they have with each other
  • Evaluate the importance of setting
  • Explain the playwright’s use of stage directions
  • Track the changes in character’s behaviour and thoughts
  • Explore a range of drama strategies to understand how to engage with an audience

How will I be assessed?
A monologue from the perspective of Dr Frankenstein or the monster and an analysis of the writer’s craft.
Unit 5: Non – Fiction: Titanic
During this unit, you will read and respond to a range of non-fiction texts with a focus on The Titanic, with opportunities to create your own non-fiction texts.
You will:

  • Evaluate a writer’s purpose in writing non-fiction
  • Recognise textual conventions
  • Learn to discriminate between the relevance of parts of text well selecting information
  • Begin to use vocabulary to convey complex and original ideas
  • Improve the cohesion of paragraphs by rearranging sentences and using a range of connectives
  • Skilfully create imaginative and thoughtful non-fiction pieces that engage a reader

How will I be assessed?
A speaking and listening task will be integrated into the scheme alongside a creative piece where students write a first person account to describe the sinking of the Titanic.
 
Year 8 English
Unit 1: Baseline Test and Poetry
During this unit, you will read and study a range of gothic poems and also explore a range of strategies to develop skills in descriptive and narrative writing under the theme of ‘Murder Mystery’.
You will:

  • Evaluate and analyse the writer’s use of language
  • Explore the impact of a writer’s form and structure in a poem
  • Learn to apply a range of sentence structures for effect
  • Create paragraphs unified around a theme or a topic
  • Write in a form and style that achieves a specific effect on the reader
  • Apply an ambitious range of vocabulary to achieve various effects
  • Sustain roles, voice and point of view to engage the reader
  • Identify syllable blocks to help you spell complex words correctly

How will I be assessed?
An essay evaluating the poets’ use of stylistic devices and how this affects the reader.
Unit 2: Poetry
During this unit, you will read and explore a range of poems by Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage
You will:

  • Make inferences based on different parts of poems and techniques used
  • Evaluate how successfully poets structure their texts
  • Compare the tone and exact meaning of word choices, and how they contribute to the overall mood of a poem
  • Explain how the poet has used language to achieve the response they were aiming for
  • Identify and comment on the effectives of figurative language in different poems
  • Develop your skills in applying PEE in order to formally respond to a text

How will I be assessed?
A piece of empathetic creative writing that is linked to the themes and characters presented within the poems studied.
Unit 3: Class Novel
During this unit, you will read and study a novel of the War genre. Novels include, Private Peaceful, Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and Bomber Boys.
You will:

  • Improve the depth of your response to a text based on your inferences.
  • Evaluate the author’s intentions
  • Confidently analyse a text using Point, Evidence, Explain (PEE)
  • Evaluate a writer’s use of language and its effect on the reader
  • Select apt quotations from across a text to prove a point
  • Consistently apply formal language to respond to a text

How will I be assessed?
An essay in response to the writer’s exploration of theme, character or setting
Unit 4: Shakespeare – Macbeth
During this unit, you will read and study Shakespeare’s play Macbeth. Differentiated versions of the text are studied across the year group.
You will:

  • Develop an in-depth response to a text based on your inferences
  • Analyse the writer’s purpose
  • Develop your understanding and application of Point, Evidence, Explain (PEE) when analysing a text
  • Identify and evidence a texts effect on the reader and say how that effect has been created
  • Select apt and appropriate quotations from a text to prove a point
  • Apply formal language consistently when responding to a text

How will I be assessed?
An essay in response to the writer’s exploration of theme and character, showing an understanding of context.
Unit 5: Non – Fiction: Biographical Writing
During this unit, you will read and respond to a range of biographical writing with a focus on literary devices and narrative voice.
You will:

  • Evaluate a writer’s purpose in writing non-fiction
  • Recognise textual conventions of biographies
  • Learn to discriminate between the relevance of parts of text well selecting information
  • Begin to use vocabulary to convey complex and original ideas
  • Improve the cohesion of paragraphs by rearranging sentences and using a range of connectives
  • Skilfully create imaginative and thoughtful non-fiction pieces that engage a reader

How will I be assessed?
A piece of writing that represents the life of a person you admire.
Year 9 English
Unit 1: Of Mice and Men
During this unit, you will read ‘Of Mice and Men’ by John Steinbeck and explore how the characters of Lennie, George and Curley’s Wife are presented.
You will:

  • Look at the setting of ‘Of Mice and Men’ and begin to explore how this has influenced the writer
  • Examine the mood and atmosphere and how this is used by the writer to create effects
  • Look closely at how language is used by characters in the novel and gain an understanding of idiolect and dialect
  • Write in role to show your understanding of character, relationships and plot

How will I be assessed?
Writing a letter in role as Curley’s Wife.
Unit 2: American Prose
During this unit, you will read and explore a range of extracts from seminal American novels.
You will:

  • Select purposeful quotes that allow you to explore the text at word-level
  • Find alternative aspects of your explanation.
  • Track and trace how details in the text can contribute to overall meaning in light of the task or question set.
  • Analyse and find evidence to explore how a text can be influenced by earlier texts, a genre, or contemporary society across the unit.

How will I be assessed?
To analyse how Benjamin Button is presented in an extract from ‘The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.’
Unit 3: Non-Fiction Skills
During this unit, you will read a novel and practise your non-fiction writing alongside it. Novels include: Room and Never Let Me Go.
You will:

  • Mix elements of style, including stylistic devices, narrative, dialogue and humour and irony in your writing
  • Adapt the formality of the text to its purpose and your audience in order to achieve specific effects
  • Practise using a range of sentences and punctuation
  • Ensure that you choose your vocabulary with your reader in mind – choose words that might have multiple layers of meaning

How will I be assessed?
An exam style paper that mimics the GCSE English Language exam you will take in Year 11.
Unit 4: Shakespeare – A Midsummer Night’s Dream
During this unit, you will read and study Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Differentiated versions of the text are studied across the year group.
You will:

  • Develop an in-depth response to a text based on your inferences
  • Analyse the writer’s purpose
  • Develop your understanding and application of Point, Evidence, Explain (PEE) when analysing a text
  • Identify and evidence a texts effect on the reader and say how that effect has been created
  • Select apt and appropriate quotations from a text to prove a point
  • Apply formal language consistently when responding to a text

How will I be assessed?
An essay in response to the writer’s exploration of theme and character, showing an understanding of context.
Unit 5: Victorian Literature
During this unit, you will read and respond to a range of extracts from Victorian novels to prepare you for your GCSE Literature exam.
You will:

  • Practise close reading of a text
  • Research the context
  • Learn how to present studied, reasoned opinions.
  • Develop an understanding of key literary devices and how to spot them in a text
  • An awareness of literature of this period and how writers are influenced by their changing environment.

How will I be assessed?
A close reading analysis of an extract from Emily Bronte’s ‘Wuthering Heights.’
Unit 6: Preparing for GCSE Literature and Language
During this unit, you will read and annotate three poems in preparation for your English Literature GCSE: William Blake’s ‘London’, Browning’s ‘My Last Duchess’ and Shelley’s ‘Ozymandias.’ You will then spend the final three weeks looking at how to infer meaning from language using the film ‘The Fault in our Stars’ as a stimulus.
You will:

  • Start to prepare for your GCSE by making detailed annotations on three poems
  • Look for structural techniques such as repetition, juxtaposition, plot and sub-plots, poetic form, enjambment etc.
  • Explain the effect on the reader and overall meaning.
  • Develop an analytical explanation of how a writer establishes their viewpoint.
  • Say where in the text this is evident and why they feel this.

How will I be assessed?
An end of key stage exam will be focused on ‘London.’

Key Stage 4

Subject: GCSE English Language
What will I learn?
The specification is designed to assess students’ skills in English at all levels, providing questions that are accessible to all while stretching and challenging the highest of achievers.
The specification is encapsulated within two equally-balanced papers, relating to the topic and theme of writing tasks. The reading sources act as a stimulus for writing tasks, providing students with a clear route through each paper. Paper 1 is centred around Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing, and looks at how writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to engage the interest of readers. Paper 2, Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives, looks at how different writers present a similar topic over time. The spoken language unit will emphasise the importance of the wider benefits that speaking and listening skills have for students.
How will I be assessed?
The course is linear and examined at the end of Year 11. There are no longer any controlled assessment components within this new GCSE specification, therefore the exams are worth 100%. Students will be assessed over a 3 ½ hour period, split equally across two papers, giving them time to express their true abilities and achieve the best possible grade.
The qualification will be graded from 1 to 9.

Course: GCSE English Language
Exam Board: AQA
Exam Specification Code: 8700

Specification

Subject: GCSE English Literature
What will I learn?
All students are required to study English Literature along with Language in September 2015. Being a literate reader widens horizons and opens up a lifetime of opportunities. Reading enables students to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know.
The specification is examined across two papers. Paper 1 is centred around the study of a Shakespearean play and a 19th century novel. Students will receive guidance on both of these texts during the course and will be steered in the direction of a specified act and chapter of the texts at the beginning of the Spring term prior to the exam. Paper 2 is centred around modern drama, a poetry collection that has been taught and explored within lessons, and finally unseen poetry.
How will I be assessed?
The course is linear and examined at the end of Year 11. There are no longer any controlled assessment components within this new GCSE specification, therefore the exams are worth 100%. Students will be assessed over a 4 hour period, split over two papers, grouping similarly structured questions together, to allow students to maintain their focus. Students will be required to answer essay questions to communicate their responses to the texts that they are presented with.
The qualification will be graded from 1 to 9.

Course: GCSE English Literature
Exam Board: AQA
Exam Specification Code: 8702

Specification

Key Stage 5

What will I study?
You will be introduced to a range of texts across the two year course from different periods, styles and genres. These will include a variety of plays, poems and works in translation.   The course is divided into four parts, each part having a particular focus. The aim of the course is to develop your ability to form independent literary judgments and to support those ideas. This is a challenging and rewarding course that provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking.
Difference between HL & SL
The main difference between higher and standard levels is the way you will be assessed and the number of texts you will study across the two years. You will study a total number of 10 works for standard level and 13 for higher.

  • Part 1: Works in translation
    SL—2 works; HL—3 works
    Snow Country – Yasunari Kawabata
    Woman at Point Zero – Nawal El Saadawi
    Chronicle of a Death Foretold – Gabriel Garcie-Marquez
  • Part 2: Detailed study
    SL—2 works; HL—3 works
    Hamlet- William Shakespeare
    Othello – William Shakespeare
    Collected Poems – Sylvia Plath
    Collected Poems – William Blake and William Wordsworth
  • Part 3: Literary genres
    SL—3 works; HL—4 works
    A Streetcar Named Desire – Tennessee Williams
    The Crucible – Arthur Miller
    King Lear – William Shakespeare
  • Part 4: Options
    SL—3 works; HL—3 works
    The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    Catcher in the Rye – J D Salinger
    The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
    Enduring Love – Ian McEwan
    Animal Farm – George Orwell

How will I be assessed?
Although assessments differs between standard and higher level, they will include two orally assessed pieces, a written essay (including reflective statement and supervised writing) and two written exams that are externally marked.
The main differences between the two levels are:
Paper one (exam)

  • SL students are asked to produce a guided literary analysis, on either a prose passage or a poem, and address two questions in their answer.
  • HL students are required to write a literary commentary on either a prose passage or a poem – the same as before.
  • SL—1hour 30 minutes
  • HL—2 hours

Paper two (exam)

  • SL and HL students write one essay based on at least two works studied.
  • The exam paper is the same for both SL and HL – the assessment criteria is different.
  • SL—1hour 30 minutes
  • HL—2 hours

Literature in Translation (essay)

  • SL and HL students submit an assignment based on one of the works in translation studied.
  • The assignment consists of:
  • a reflective statement on an interactive oral,
  • an essay, developed from a piece of personal writing that is produced in class.
  • Length: reflective statement 300–400 words; essay 1,200–1,500 words

Orally assessed components

  • SL and HL students complete two tasks that are internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB.

Detailed Study

  • Individual oral commentary (SL): 10 minutes, based on part 2 works
  • Individual oral commentary (HL): 10 minutes on poetry, followed by 10 minutes discussing one of the other part 2 works

Options

  • Individual oral presentation: 10–15 minutes, based on one or more part 4 works

What coursework will I need to do?
You will be required to study independently some elements of the Literature in Translation part of the course. The required stages of the process are:

  • Reading – studied as a class
  • Research leading to the delivery of the interactive oral
  • Supervised in-class writing
  • Essay

Case Study
Five students from the previous academic year alone have progressed on to English degree courses at institutions such as the University of Birmingham, Coventry University and the University of Derby.
Student comment:
I am currently in the second year of my IB course (International Baccalaureate) and study English as one of my Higher Level Subjects.  My work at the CTC has allowed me to explore the language in great depth, enabling me to experience different cultures and perspective of numerous authors. This has helped me develop in many areas including; Creative Writing, Analytical study in Literature and English Language. Not only have I improved academically, but the nature of the course encourages a variety of learning activities such as class discussions, formal presentations and oral commentaries that have given me a solid understanding and knowledge within the subject. I feel that this has also prepared me for University, as I have now decided to complete a degree in English Literature after the challenging but enjoyable journey I have made so far.

Course: Language A: Literature
Exam Board: IB

Specification